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Assistant coach Mike McQueary will not be at the Penn State's next football game, not because of his role in the school's sexual abuse scandal, but because of concerns for his safety. McQueary has apparently received "multiple threats" and the university said it would be "in the best interest of all" if he didn't attend the final home game of the year on Saturday.

The school has taken a lot of heat for firing head coach Joe Paterno, but not disciplining McQueary, who told a grand jury that he witnessed former assistant Jerry Sandusky raping a young boy in a Penn State locker room. The fact that this decision is being forced by threats of violence adds one more ugly twist to an already awful story. 

The situation won't get any better for McQueary in the following weeks as the team visits rival Ohio State and then Wisconsin. If the school doesn't think they can protect him on their home campus, it's hard to see how he could attend road games either. He could choose to step down voluntarily, but his football career would basically be finished after this incident. His tarnished name and now recognizable face make it unlikely that any other team would hire him again.

Paterno also reportedly reached out to a major criminal defense attorney for legal assistance. He is not expected to be charged with any crimes, but may be the target of future lawsuits and investigations.

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.

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