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Today in higher education and academia news: a cheating scandal rocks a U.S. submarine, a professor explains why he resigned over a Genesis controversy, two more law schools embrace military recruiters and, yes, it's easier to get into Harvard grad school if your already at Harvard.

  • Surprise! Ivy League grad schools like Ivy League undergrad applicants says a new, albeit small, case study performed by website Poets and Quants that analyzed the Facebook profiles of the Harvard Business School's incoming Class of 2013. "Harvard undergrads make up an estimated 9.4% of the class with an estimated 86 MBA candidates out of an incoming class of 918 students," the site wrote. "Together, all five schools (Stanford, Penn, Yale, Columbia University, Harvard) account for 26.7% of the entire class." [Poets and Quants, Los Angeles Times]
  • A Christian professor resigned after questioning Biblical literalism. After professor John Schneider wrote a scholarly paper saying that the biblical story of Adam and Eve shouldn't be taken literally, his employer, Calvin College, received a wave of angry responses. He eventually reached a mutual decision with the school to resign, saying that he didn't want tensions to cause "harm and distraction," according to a statement. In an interview with Inside Higher Ed he explains, "My view is that any Christian denomination that can't articulate itself credibly in ways in which science is regarded as true is in danger of being marginalized. That's what I was trying to do. I was trying to be constructive."[Inside Higher Ed]
  • Two more law schools embrace military recruiters after DADT repeal. The Vermont Law School and the William Mitchell College will reopen their schools to military recruiters. But the AP reports that they may have had another reason for doing so other than protesting Don't Ask Don't Tell: "By refusing the recruiters access to students on their campuses, they sacrificed eligibility for federal grants — at Vermont Law School, officials estimate that they missed out on about $500,000 annually." [Associated Press]
  • U.S. Navy discovers a cheating ring aboard a submarine.  The Navy denied that cheating is rampant, but aboard the USS Memphis 10 percent of the crew was ordered off the sub after a cheating ring was discovered. An investigation the AP obtained through FOIA found: "Sailors were emailed the answers before qualification exams, took tests outside the presence of proctors and openly asked officers for answer keys. One sailor told investigators that test-takers were encouraged to "use their time wisely" during breaks, insinuating that they should look up answers to exam questions." [Associated Press]

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