Sheryl Gay Stolber looks at why women politicos are less likely to be caught in sex scandals:


Research points to a substantial gender gap in the way women and men approach running for office. Women have different reasons for running, are more reluctant to do so and, because there are so few of them in politics, are acutely aware of the scrutiny they draw -- all of which seems to lead to differences in the way they handle their jobs once elected.

I'm more convinced by the latter reasoning than the former. In the broadest sense, I think power is key here. If I go out with my friends and get so drunk that I'm throwing up in a cab, many awful things might happen to me. Being sexually assaulted by a cop may be one of them, but it's considerably further down the list for me, than it is for a woman.

Power allows for recklessness. I strongly suspect that an ambitious, intelligent woman, entering in a field where soliciting the support of large swaths of people is key, knows that well.

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