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Violent storms and some 30 tornadoes have ripped through the South over the past two days, bringing the death toll up to 17 in Arkansas, Alabama, and Oklahoma.

Cars were tossed, power lines were snapped, and, in Alabama, a mobile home was tossed nearly a quarter of a mile across a state highway, reports the Associated Press. In Jackson, Mississippi, an 18-wheel semi-trailer truck flipped over on I-20, shutting down the highway.

Six of the seven fatalities in Arkansas were caused when uprooted trees smashed into houses, National Weather Service meteorologist John Robinson told Reuters. Rescue crews found a 34-year-old woman in bed with her 7-year-old, whom she had apparently come to comfort during the overnight storm. The two were killed when a giant oak tree fell on the home.

Numerous power poles were also snapped in Jackson along the storm's path, leaving more than 23,400 customers without power, utility company Entergy Mississippi said.

Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley declared a state of emergency Friday after reports of tornadoes in at at least six counties. Mississippi Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant and Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin similarly ordered states of emergency Friday for 14 Mississippi counties and 26 Oklahoma counties, respectively.

The same weather system is expected to continue through Saturday when it moves into the Carolinas, Reuters reports. A video of the storms from Jackson, Mississippi is below.

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