Malcolm X's daughters are having it out:


The daughters have traded accusations of irresponsibility, mental incapacity and fiscal mismanagement of the estate, which is worth about $1.4 million. But the greater value may reside in a trove of unpublished works from Malcolm X and Dr. Shabazz. 

As the dispute drags on in Westchester County Surrogate's Court, efforts to publish the works have been thwarted by the daughters' bickering; all must sign off on any plan to sell and release the material, which includes four journals that Malcolm X kept during trips to Africa and the Middle East in 1964, a year before his assassination. 

The battle represents the latest turn in the complex journey of a family that has come to define the struggle and pride of blacks in America. The clash also underscores the difficulty of preserving the legacy of a prominent figure, especially when it requires uniting competing personalities and visions.

Regrettably, this is not unusual for the progeny of the movement. I had initial pang of sadness, but the fact is that this is not unusual for people. It's easy to forget, in the haze of great sacrifice, that you are still talking about humans.

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