From a business news site:

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I'm a notorious bore about big enthusiast for small-plane general aviation and non-airline flight, and whenever I can invent a rationalization for doing so, I will fly a little four-seat propeller plane somewhere rather than going commercial. It's flexible; door-to-door it's often faster; if I count only the direct fuel costs I can tell myself it's less expensive; and mainly I just love doing it. So I'm usually glad to hear any news that bolsters America's general-aviation economy. 

BUT: it's hard to see this news as something other than Chapter 4,312 in the "Polarization of America" saga. As public life deteriorates -- public schools, public roads, public health care, public transportation as involves TSA-era commercial airlines -- the people with the most money and the most influence can exempt themselves from the worsening public sphere. Which then worsens all the more. It takes a lot to have me view a "good news for aviation" story as potentially bad news in some larger sense. But that is how I see this one.

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