Baz Ratner / Reuters

Today’s Issue:



Power in the modern world often flows to those who see where the world’s resources are flowing, yet have the sleight of hand to redirect them without the world seeing. So it was when democratic leaders in the United States and elsewhere applauded last week’s peaceful transfer of power in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, from an autocratic president to an opposition leader. But things aren’t as they seem, as today’s story will attest. The lesson: Having power in today’s world doesn’t necessarily require maintaining absolute control, though that doesn’t hurt.

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