NASA / Reuters

Karen here, the new fellow at The Masthead. When we asked you for your memories of 1968, nearly 100 rich and thoughtful stories poured into our inboxes. You told us about your experiences in high schools, universities, and military hospitals. I followed up with a few members who experienced the year from different vantage points, at different ages. Together, their stories provide color and texture to what it was like to grow up in one of the most tumultuous years of the 20th century.


What Was on Your Mind in 1968?

Our members, whether they were in middle school in New York or law school in North Carolina, shared similar anxieties and hopes. Everyone I spoke with named the Vietnam War as a permanent, haunting presence on their television screens. They were shaken by the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. They were filled with wonder at the first manned mission around the moon.

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