Reuters

Congress recently came close to creating a United States Space Corps, a new branch of the U.S. military intended to defend American interests in space. It would have been the first new military branch since Congress created the Air Force in 1947. Today, Thomas González Roberts, a space security researcher at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, explains why this is a story that those of us on Earth should pay attention to. Here’s Thomas.

A WAR IN SPACE WOULD BE A WAR WITHOUT RULES  

One hundred miles above the Earth’s surface, orbiting the planet at thousands of miles per hour, the six people aboard the International Space Station enjoy a perfect isolation from the chaos of earthly conflict. Outer space has never been a military battleground. But that may not last forever. The debate in Congress over whether to create a Space Corps comes at a time when governments around the world are engaged in a bigger international struggle over how militaries should operate in space. Fundamental changes are already underway. No longer confined to the fiction shelf, space warfare is likely on the horizon.

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