Table of Contents

VOLUME 269 No. 1 JANUARY 1992

The Atlantic

Pt BLUSHED CONTINUOUSLY SINCE 1857

Page 74

Page 83

Page 119

REPORTS & COMMENT

20

WASHINGTON

COOKED BOOKS

A common thread running through the financial scandals of the past decade has been the failure of the major U.S. accounting firms, for reasons often unsavory, to conduct proper audits of the nation’s banks, savings-and-loan associations, insurance companies, and industrial corporations.

byWILLIAM STERNBERG

REPORTS & COMMENT

40

NEW YORK

No RADIO

The author calculates that a car is broken into about every thirty seconds in New York City; in many cases a car radio is stolen. A look at where all those stolen radios go, and at creative approaches to forestalling their theft.

byEDWARD ZUCKKRMAN

FICTION AND POETRY

89

WORD PLAY

AN ANTHOLOGY

byGLYN MAXWELL,

THOMAS LUX,

AND

SAHRON BRYAN

FICTION AND POETRY

90

THE PEOPLE WE MARRY

byTIM O’BRIEN

OTHER DEPARTMENTS

47

THE BUTTERFLY PROBLEM

Grounded in the “Noah Principle”—the view, shared by many conservationists, that all species have a right to exist—the Endangered Species Act insists that we attempt to save every threatened species. This inflexibility, the authors say, has now become economically untenable.

byCHARLES C. MANN

AND

MARK L. PLUMMER

OTHER DEPARTMENTS

74

STOPGAP MEASURES

The extinction of any species is a tragedy, but the time has come, the author contends, to introduce the idea oi triage into conservation efforts. Instead of spending millions of dollars to save a few “terminally ill” species, we should promote biodiversity more broadly by protecting the health of whole ecosystems.

bySUZANNE WINCKLKR

OTHER DEPARTMENTS

83

THE CASE FOR HUMAN BEINGS

Homo sapiens has begun to see itself as “a vast, featureless mob of yahoos mindlessly trampling this planet’s most ancient and delicate harmonies.” Maybe, the author suggests, we’re being too hard on ourselves.

byTHOMAS PALMER

ARTS AND LEISURE

100

MUSIC

LITTLE TIME TO SPARE

A reflection on the meaning of Mozart’s death, in his own time and in ours.

byWILFRID MELLERS

ARTS AND LEISURE

105

TRAVEL

FOR THE CRUISE-SUSPICIOUS

Not for party animals, sail and windjammer cruises confound the cruise stereotype.

byBARBARA WALLRAFF

BOOKS

BOOKS

109

SHOULD SUBURBS BE DESIGNED?

Making a Middle Landscape, by Peter G. Rowe

byWITOLD RYBCZYNSKI

BOOKS

112

FREUD’S PHALANX

The Secret Ring, by Phyllis Grosskurth

byPAUL ROBINSON

BOOKS

114

BRIEF REVIEWS

byPHOEBE-LOU ADAMS

OTHER DEPARTMENTS

OTHER DEPARTMENTS

4

745 BOYLSTON STREET/ CONTRIBUTORS

OTHER DEPARTMENTS

6

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

OTHER DEPARTMENTS

18

THE JANUARY ALMANAC

OTHER DEPARTMENTS

99

FIRST ENCOUNTERS

George Gordon Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley

byEDWARD SOREL

AND

NANCY CALDWELL SORKL

OTHER DEPARTMENTS

117

THE PUZZLER

byEMILY COX

AND

HENRY RATHVON

ARTS AND LEISURE

119

WORD HISTORIES

byCRAIG M. CARVER

THE ATLANTIC (ISSN 0276-90771 is published monthly In The Atlantic Monthly Company. 745 Boylston St., Boston. MA 02116. Second-class postage paid at Boston. MA. Toronto. ON. and additional mailing offices. Subscriptions: $15.94 for one year, $27.95 for two years. $39.95 for three years in the United States and its possessions; $6.00 additional a year in Canada; $10.00 additional a year elsewhere. Address all subscription correspondence to Atlantic Subscription Processing Center. Box 52661, Boulder, CO 80322 or call (8OO) 234-2411; in Colorado 1-447-9330. For back issues, send $5.00 per cops to The Atlantic. Back Issues, 200 North 12th St.. Newark. NJ 07107. Vol. 269. No. 1 January 1992. Copyright © 1991. by The Atlantic Monthly Company. All rights reserved. I nsolicited manuscripts will be returned only if accompanied by a return envelope and postage. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Atlantic. Box 52648. Boulder, CO 80322.