A Few Objections Concerning Elections

by C. S. JENNISON
ALTHOUGH I’m told it’s better sense (considering the French and all)
For certain U.S. Parties to have parties in Convention Hall,
I dread the coming era of decision and derision
Thai I must view in movies, print and homes with television.
While I respect the struggle for a president-elect,
’The way I like to view it best is this: in retrospect.
The storm of raging rhetoric, unending and repetitive,
I find — instead of stirring me — starts working like a sedative.
As each bold figure hails or flails whichever candidate
From whatsoever grand old town or great old scenic state,
I yaw n and yearn for brevity; I pine for mediocrities
With just one modest orator who doesn’t act like Socrates.
I hope whoever runs this time — Ike, Adlai, Dick or Kefauver —
The National Committees will endeavor to be brief over.
Although I know the months ahead are certain to be tough,
They won’t be too much better if the Parties all get rough.
At each four-year fiasco, as the speeches grow more raucous,
I wish I’d never learned to tell a crocus from a caucus.