Greenlandic sled dogs keep watch on a visitor near their pen in Ilulissat, Greenland.Bob Strong / Reuters

The World’s Most Unusual Military Unit
Denver David Robinson | The Christian Science Monitor
“While most soldiers around the world worry about the dangers of war, members of Denmark’s unique Sledge Patrol Sirius face a different set of challenges—cryogenic winds, quaggy glaciers, frostbite, and polar bears.”

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Refugees Encounter a Foreign Word: Welcome
Jodi Kantor and Catrin Einhorn | The New York Times
“Across Canada, ordinary citizens, distressed by news reports of drowning children and the shunning of desperate migrants, are intervening in one of the world’s most pressing problems. Their country allows them a rare power and responsibility: They can band together in small groups and personally resettle—essentially adopt—a refugee family. In Toronto alone, hockey moms, dog-walking friends, book club members, poker buddies and lawyers have formed circles to take in Syrian families.”

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Lunch With the FT: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
David Pilling | Financial Times
“Food features prominently in her writing. ‘It’s probably the best way to get into time, place, class, culture. It’s a breathing detail that lives on the page.’ In Americanah, she describes Nigerian food, approvingly, as ‘sweaty and spicy.’ Nigerian characters who have spent too long in the U.S., like Adichie, develop effete tastes. She admits to sneaking off to a ‘bougie’ (bourgeois) Lagos establishment for her smoothie fix.”

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The Reluctant Memoirist
Suki Kim | The New Republic
“There are only two kinds of books on North Korea: those by white journalists who visited the country under the regime’s supervision, and ‘as told to’ memoirs by defectors. The intellectual hierarchy is clear—authority belongs to the white gaze. Orientalism reigns.”

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What Brexit Means for British Food
Bee Wilson | The New Yorker
“The EU can’t take sole credit for the fact that the British now know pesto from salsa verde. Probably some kind of food revolution would have happened here anyway, just as it did in the States and Australia over the same period. But to contemplate Brexit is to see the extent to which Britain is not a food island. We eat food cooked by French and Italian chefs using European ingredients. More than a quarter of those working in food manufacturing in Britain are immigrants from within the EU. We could not eat as we do without them. British food has also benefitted from the EU’s protected-designated-origin (P.D.O.) system, which gives protected status to special regional foods, from Périgord walnuts to the Brocciu cheese of Corsica. It took Europe—through P.D.O.—to remind Britons of the specialness of native delicacies like Cornish clotted cream, Whitstable oysters, and Yorkshire rhubarb.”

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Against the Continent
Jon Day, Maya Jasanoff, and Calum Watt | n+1
“I’ve spent much of the last ten years studying twentieth-century European literature and thought, and one lesson that comes up repeatedly is that Europe really can crash and burn.”

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