The South Pole Telescope and the IceCube Neutrino Observatory at the Amundsen-Scott research station in AntarcticaEli Duke / Flickr

What I Saw in Syria
Declan Walsh | The New York Times Magazine
“This was the harsh reality of Syria. And this was just one day, in one city, of a war that has lasted five years.”

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The Bears Who Came to Town and Would Not Go Away
Sarah A. Topol | Outside
“While the American species are widely studied, there are practically no bear experts in Primorsky, [Russia], where I relied on hunters and park rangers to relay local lore. For example, I was told that bears love to booze. [Anatoly] Tarasenko said that they are known to break into cellars and waddle away with containers of honey moonshine. He described them as abominable drunks. ‘They roll around, roar, sleep,’ he explained. ‘It looks like a pogrom. Everything is broken, thrown around.’”

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A Day of Infamy
Alex Massie | The Spectator
“Sometimes rhetoric has consequences. If you spend days, weeks, months, years telling people they are under threat, that their country has been stolen from them, that they have been betrayed and sold down the river, that their birthright has been pilfered, that their problem is they’re too slow to realise any of this is happening, that their problem is they’re not sufficiently mad as hell, then at some point, in some place, something or someone is going to snap. And then something terrible is going to happen.”

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The Unrecognized
Joshua Keating | Roads and Kingdoms
“It was an incongruous chant from the small crowd at a rudimentary soccer field nestled between the Caucasus Mountains and the Black Sea, but one that over the week would be regularly and passionately echoed from the stands. The Somaliland National Football Team, a gregarious squad representing a controversial disputed territory in East Africa, made up mostly of the children of refugees living in Europe, had become the hometown team of Gagra, a past-its-prime resort town in the similarly controversial and disputed pseudo-state of Abkhazia.”

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What a ‘Brexit’ Could Mean for the Economy
Ben Casselman | FiveThirtyEight
“The reality is, though, that no one really knows how bad a Brexit would be, either for Britain or for the rest of the world. No country has ever left the EU, and there has never been another institution quite like it, so there are no true historical parallels. And, just as importantly, no one really knows what Britain’s relationship with the EU would look like after it left.”

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A Rare, Risky Mission is Underway to Rescue Sick Scientists From the South Pole
Sarah Kaplan | The Washington Post
“Two small bush planes are flying to the South Pole this week to evacuate workers at the Amundsen-Scott research station—a feat rarely attempted during the middle of the Antarctic winter.”

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