An Indian nomadic Maldhari woman and a girl walk with their camel on a highway on the outskirts of Ahmadabad, India.Ajit Solanki / AP

Why Are the Soccer Hooligans of Argentina Killing Each Other?
Amos Barshad | The FADER
“It is across the Atlantic, in lovely Argentina, where the hooligans have evolved on a whole different wavelength. The British made soccer hooliganism a bizarre cultural artifact. The Argentines have made soccer hooliganism into a legitimate, if deathly dangerous, career choice. As Javier Beltramone, a Rosario prosecutor involved in the ongoing legal campaign against the Newell’s barra brava, has explained: ‘Under the pretext of love of a club, spurious criminal business structures are hidden.’”

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Korea’s Air Is Dirty, But It’s Not All Close Neighbor China’s Fault
Elise Hu | NPR
“Neighboring China almost always gets the blame for the dirty air in Korea. Pollution numbers there are far worse than Korea’s, and this complicates Korea’s efforts to clean its own air.”

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Trump and the World: What Could Actually Go Wrong
Ian Bremmer | POLITICO Magazine
“Trump is certainly an unknown quantity—perhaps even a radical disruption to the current order. But what are the actual global risks that a Trump presidency would pose?”

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They Walk on the Roadside. He Stops to Ask Why.
Matthieu Paley | National Geographic
“On a long stretch of highway between Delhi and Maharashtra, I first saw a fleeting figure on the periphery of my vision. It seemed odd. ... Was someone really walking on the highway? Even in India, it’s not easy to stop on the freeway, so I drove on.”

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The Wars of Vladimir Putin
Timothy Snyder | The New York Review of Books
“How did Russia reach a point, in its media and politics, where the fact of Russian soldiers mistakenly shooting down a civilian airliner during a Russian invasion of a foreign country could be transformed into a durable sense of Russian victimhood? For that matter, how did Russians take so easily to the idea that Ukraine, seen as a fraternal nation, had suddenly become an enemy governed by ‘fascists’? How do Russians take pride in a Russian invasion while at the same time denying that one is taking place? Consider the dark joke now making the rounds in Russia. Wife to husband: ‘Our son was killed in action in Ukraine.’ Husband to wife: ‘We never had a son.’”

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How Will ‘Brexit’ Vote Go? Monty Python May Offer Clue
Sarah Lyall | The New York Times
“Jackie O’Neill, a 54-year-old administrative assistant, was explaining the other day why Britain should vote to divorce itself from the European Union in this month’s referendum. As she enumerated her many grievances, I couldn’t help thinking of the scene in Monty Python’s ‘Life of Brian’ in which a bunch of disaffected Judeans sit around, complaining about the Romans.”

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