People stand next to graffiti near Mexico's Federal Electoral Institute (IFE) in Mexico City, in 2012.Edgard Garrido / Reuters

The French Connection
William McCants and Christopher Meserole | Foreign Affairs
“What we found surprised us, particularly when it came to foreign fighter radicalization. It turns out that the best predictor of foreign fighter radicalization was not a country’s wealth. Nor was it how well-educated its citizens were, how healthy they were, or even how much Internet access they enjoyed. Instead, the top predictor was whether a country was Francophone; that is, whether it currently lists (or previously listed) French as a national language. As strange as it may seem, four of the five countries with the highest rates of radicalization in the world are Francophone, including the top two in Europe (France and Belgium).”

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To Live and Die in Mumbai
Sonia Faleiro | California Sunday Magazine
“India also has a long history of honor killing, of parents murdering children who they believe have dishonored them—most often for pursuing a relationship of their choice and not allowing their parents to select a partner for them. The word honor represents what is lost to parents when their child has publicly defied and thus shamed them. But honor killings usually take place in rural India. Much more rare are urban parents murdering their children for something that is increasingly considered a forgivable offense in modern India—marrying for love. What made Indrani [Mukerjea]’s arrest shocking was the possibility that an educated woman would have succumbed to the backward ways of a villager.”

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From the Outside In: Meet the African Immigrants Who Are Legitimizing Ireland’s Hip-Hop Scene
Dean Van Nguyen | Pitchfork
“On the ear, it’s an unusual mash-up. Nigerians tend to speak with a rhythm, their words popping in time, as though being delivered by a well-tuned jazz drummer. Heavily-accented Dubliners, on the other hand, often sag into a consonant-free drawl, as if their jowls have been doused in Novocain. But Simi’s particular mix has become more common in the city as the children of Africans who first arrived on Irish shores over a decade ago come of age.”

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Life After Death
Karla Zabludovsky | Buzzfeed
“[Luz del Carmen] Sosa says the human drama that they documented during the war is no different than that of the deadly car crashes they cover regularly now. Yet, many journalists admit to missing the adrenaline surrounding grisly homicides, and a desire to cover them lurks around like a dormant addiction.”

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How ISIS Built the Machinery of Terror Under Europe’s Gaze
Rukmini Callimachi | The New York Times
“Officials now say the signs of this focused terrorist machine were readable in Europe as far back as early 2014. Yet local authorities repeatedly discounted each successive plot, describing them as isolated or random acts, the connection to the Islamic State either overlooked or played down.”

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How to Hack an Election
Jordan Robertson, Michael Riley, and Andrew Willis | Bloomberg Businessweek
“For eight years, Sepúlveda, now 31, says he traveled the continent rigging major political campaigns. With a budget of $600,000, the Peña Nieto job was by far his most complex. He led a team of hackers that stole campaign strategies, manipulated social media to create false waves of enthusiasm and derision, and installed spyware in opposition offices, all to help Peña Nieto, a right-of-center candidate [for Mexico’s presidency], eke out a victory. On that July night, he cracked bottle after bottle of Colón Negra beer in celebration. As usual on election night, he was alone.”

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