A woman wearing a headscarf is framed by Turkish flags depicting the founder of modern Turkey, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, in Istanbul's Taksim Square.Yannis Behrakis / Reuters

GPS Mix-Up Brings Wrong Turn, and Celebrity, to an American in Iceland
Dan Bilefsky | The New York Times
“When Noel Santillan typed the word Laugarvegur instead of Laugavegur into his rental car’s GPS, the New Jersey resident couldn’t have imagined that the extra ‘r’ would make him something of a celebrity in Iceland.”

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Donald Rumsfeld’s Solitaire Game Puts Futility at Your Fingertips
Tom Scocca | Kotaku
“What losers write is autobiography. Something compels them to it. Solitaire is a game built around creating a mess and then trying to work your way through the mess to an orderly resolution, which may be impossible. Of all the activities in the world to build a game app around, Donald Rumsfeld chose this one.”

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Cover Story
Elif Batuman | The New Yorker
“In 2010, I moved to Istanbul, where I taught at a university and reported for this magazine for three years. I found that, much like America, Turkey was polarizing into two camps that were increasingly unable to communicate with each other. There was a new dichotomy I had never heard of before: the ‘white Turks’ (Westernized secular elites in Istanbul and Ankara) versus the ‘black Turks’ (the pious Muslim middle and lower-middle classes of Anatolia). The black Turks were the underdogs, while the white Turks were the racists who despised them.”

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Afghanistan: Threatening News
Ahmed Rashid | The New York Review of Books
“At least seven people were killed including several women in their early twenties; some of the victims were burnt and scarred beyond recognition. Another twenty-six were injured, many extremely seriously. It was easily the most deadly single attack against journalists ever made in Afghan history.”

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In Italy, an Orange to the Face
Stefania Bosso | Roads and Kingdoms
“During the battle, orange-throwers on foot attack the feudal lord’s army, represented by people on horse-drawn carriages who wear protective masks reminiscent of ancient armor. But really, anyone who isn’t wearing a berretto frigio (the traditional red hat) is fair game.”

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Europe’s Port Vulnerable As Ships Sail Without Oversight
Sam Jones | Financial Times
“There is currently no comprehensive system to track shipments and cargos through EU ports and along its approximately 70,000km of coastline—a deficiency that has long been exploited by organised criminals and which could increasingly prove irresistible to terrorists too, say European security officials.”

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