Rescue workers move a man who was injured during an earthquake in Peshawar, Pakistan.Fayaz Aziz / Reuters

Updated at 12:11 p.m. ET

A powerful earthquake that hit a remote part of Afghanistan has killed dozens of people in the country as well as in neighboring Pakistan. The magnitude-7.5 quake was felt across Central Asia and in parts of India.

The quake knocked out power lines and communications, making the scale of the destruction unclear. The death toll, which according to various news reports exceeds 100, is expected to increase.

The BBC reported that at least 150 people had died, 123 of them in Pakistan. Thirty-three are reported dead in Afghanistan, including a dozen girls who were killed in a stampede after fleeing from their school following the quake. The Associated Press quoted Pakistani officials as saying at least 147 people were killed. Hundreds were injured in both countries. The AP also reported that two women died in Indian-administered Kashmir of heart attacks suffered during the quake.

Here are details about the quake from the U.S. Geological Survey:

The quake’s epicenter was in the Hindu Kush mountain region, in the province of Badakhshan, the USGS said. The sparsely populated area borders Pakistan, Tajikistan, and China. The epicenter was 130 miles deep and 45 miles south of Fayzabad, the provincial capital.

Afghan President Ashraf Ghani sent his condolences to the families of those killed and to those who lost property, and set up a committee to ensure emergency aid quickly reaches those who need it.

Afghan Chief Executive Abdullah Abdullah said on Twitter the quake was “the strongest one felt in recent decades.” He urged people to stay outdoors because of possible aftershocks. He said there were reports of damage in the northern and eastern provinces, but the extent was unclear because mobile-phone networks were down.

Here’s what the damage looks like in Afghanistan:

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted:

Here is video footage of the quake in New Delhi:

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