Emilio Morenatti/AP

In Tarragona, Spain, an amazing tower was erected, and quickly fell apart into a cluster of body parts. The towers, known traditionally as castells, have been built since the 18th century by Catalan acrobats. And as with any good tradition, there is, of course, an element of competition. On Sunday, teams adorned in unique, brightly colored attire competed to create the highest and most complex human tower.

This year marked the 25th official Human Tower Competition and several photographers traveled to view the eccentric athletes in action. Associated Press photojournalist Emilio Morenatti explained, "The structure of the castells varies depending on their complexity. A castell is considered completely successful when it is loaded and unloaded without falling apart."

Emilio Morenatti/AP
Emilio Morenatti/AP
Emilio Morenatti/AP
Emilio Morenatti/AP
Albert Gea/Reuters
Emilio Morenatti/AP
Emilio Morenatti/AP
Emilio Morenatti/AP
Emilio Morenatti/AP
Albert Gea/Reuters

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