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Alex Salmond, the leader of the pro-independence Scottish National Party (SNP), accused Prime Minister David Cameron and other London politicians on Sunday of tricking Scottish voters out of independence by making a false "vow" that would provide Scotland with new powers. 

Salmond, who announced his resignation on Friday after losing the referendum by 380,000 votes, with 55% of voters rejecting independence, said Britain's three main political parties had won by deception and are already reneging on their offer, following a row between Cameron and the Labour Party's Ed Miliband.

"I think the vow was something cooked up in desperation for the last few days of the campaign and I think everyone in Scotland now realizes that," Salmond told the BBC.

"It is the people who were persuaded to vote no (in the referendum) who were misled, who were gulled, who were tricked effectively," Salmond said. "They are the ones who are really angry."

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