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The Russian Security Council, led by President Vladimir Putin, announced they would cooperate with other global powers against the threat of the Islamic State — if, of course, the rest of the world is interested in receiving Russia's help.

Russia has been on thin ice with both the United States and United Kingdom recently, facing increased sanctions targeting their financial and energy sectors from both the US and European Union, because of their role in the unrest in Ukraine.

"Permanent members of the Security Council exchanged opinions on possible forms of cooperation with other partners on a plan to counter Islamic State in the framework of international law," said official spokesperson Dmitry Peskov. It is unclear who the "other partners" are, however, the United States has not yet replied to Russia's suggestion.

Putin is planning to attend the G20 Summit this November, even though Australia, the host nation, previously opposed Russia attending the global leadership conference after the shooting down of Malaysian Air Flight 17. The summit is organized for world leaders leaders to "discuss a wide range of global economic issues and to use their collective power to improve people’s lives."

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