This article is from the archive of our partner .

As Islamic State fighters advance on towns in Syria, a surge of Syrians (mainly Kurds from the town Kobane) have sought refuge in neighboring Turkey.

Over the weekend, we noted that Turkey had relented and allowed tens of thousands of Syrians to cross its border as battles between Kurdish and Islamic State forces in northern Syrian towns seemed imminent.

By Monday, that number had reportedly swelled to 130,000. As the AP reports:

The refugees have been flooding into Turkey since Thursday, escaping an Islamic State offensive that has pushed the conflict nearly within eyeshot of the Turkish border. The conflict in Syria has pushed more than a million people over the border in the past 3½ years.

Turkey has already had difficulties absorbing the flood of refugees from the Syrian civil war as resources strain, schools overcrowd, and discrimination against the newcomers reportedly runs rampant. 

Earlier this month, Turkey's role in enabling the creation of ISIS became a point of international focus as a U.S.-led coalition starts a campaign against the radical group. While Monday also brought news that the Islamic State advance on Kobane had been stunted, an intense battle for control of the town continues.

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.