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Just over a week ago, Alan Henning appeared at the end of an ISIS video showing hostage David Haines's tragic execution. Henning's life was threatened by the executioner, known only as "Jihadi John." Henning, a British citizen, was captured by terrorists and taken hostage last December while on his second aid mission into Syria that here — he is an active volunteer who even has "Aid For Syria" tattooed on his arm.

Now, the Henning family is coming forward with a statement about Alan's hostage and the manner in which ISIS threatened his life. They released the following statement through the United Kingdom Foreign Office, asking for his release.

I am Barbara Henning, the wife of Alan Henning.

Alan was taken prisoner last December and is being held by the Islamic State.

Alan is a peaceful, selfless man who left his family and his job as a taxi driver in the UK to drive in a convoy all the way to Syria with his Muslim colleagues and friends to help those most in need.

When he was taken he was driving an ambulance full of food and water to be handed out to anyone in need. His purpose for being there was no more and no less. This was an act of sheer compassion.

I cannot see how it could assist any state's cause to allow the world to see a man like Alan dying.

I have been trying to communicate with the Islamic State and the people holding Alan. I have sent some really important messages but they have not been responded to.

I pray that the people holding Alan respond to my messages and contact me before it is too late.

When they hear this message I implore the people of the Islamic State to see it in their hearts to release my husband Alan Henning."

Barbara Henning has also contacted ISIS, however, they have not replied. Leaders in Britain's Muslim community have also called for Henning's release, claiming that as an aid volunteer traveling to Syria to deliver supplies for a hospital, killing Henning would be a violation of Sharia law.

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.

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