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After a Spanish court blocked Catalonia's independence referendum, the regional Catalan government said Tuesday that it would suspend its planned November vote. Some Catalan activists were less than thrilled:

As we noted on Monday, the Spanish government formally filed an appeal with the courts after Catalonia President Artur Mas signed a proclamation setting November 9 as the day for the vote on a nonbinding resolution on Catalan independence from Spain. Polls have most Catalans split on independence.

While the decision by Spain's highest court made publicizing and organizing the referendum illegal, the ruling won't end the initiative entirely, which has the support of many city councils in Catalonia. The AP added:

Regional government spokesman Frances Homs said Tuesday the Catalan government would present arguments in defense of the Nov. 9 referendum and seek to have the suspension lifted."

Meanwhile, demonstrations in Barcelona and elsewhere are expected to continue.

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