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For the second time in just over a year, a helicopter has been used to help spring inmates from prison in Quebec. Last night, three men escaped from the Orsainville Detention Centre just outside of Quebec City, Quebec (which, so far as we know, is still in Canada) when a green helicopter swooped into courtyard of the complex and...well...picked them up.  

People, more or less, had the same reaction:

Police said the helicopter then took off for either "Trois-Rivieres or Montreal," which are also reportedly places in Canada. The three men were awaiting trial on unknown charges.

While it officially takes three of something to determine a trend, I think it's only fair that—given the brazenness of the act—we grant a little pass to the helicopter-assisted prison break move. Last year, two other inmates briefly escaped from a prison by grabbing a rope thrown down from a helicopter and flying off into the night.

That time an accomplice held a helicopter pilot at gunpoint to do the deed. The three men were caught hours later. Apparently, there is a history behind the move that extends beyond the movies:

A New York businessman, Joel David Kaplan, used a chopper to escape from a Mexican jail in 1971, and went on to write a book about it."

Also, a French prisoner named Pascal Payet used a helicopter to escape three times. He was eventually caught three times as well.

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