A man looks up at the border fence separating the U.S. and Mexico along the Pacific Ocean.Fred Greaves/Reuters

Crimea is hardly home to the only territorial dispute in the world right now. In the map below, every country in pink is involved in a dispute over its national borders in some way or another.

Quartz

The list is compiled by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency in its World Factbook and includes cases of disputed borders, contested islands, and larger areas contested by several countries.

Just about every nation is implicated, including some possibly surprising ones, like the reputedly peace-loving Scandinavian countries of Denmark, Norway, and Finland. There are perhaps unexpected exceptions too, including the Balkan nations of Albania, Montenegro, and Bulgaria. (Maybe it’s time to rethink the use of the word “balkanized” to describe a splintering into hostile neighbor states.)

A special mention goes to Mongolia. It’s the only country of mainland Asia not involved in territorial disputes.

Correction: an earlier version of the map featured in this post didn’t highlight the involvement of Taiwan, South Sudan, and Serbia in territorial disputes.

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