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The Muslim Brotherhood was banned by an Egyptian court on Monday, forcing the group back underground completing its skyrocket rise and fall after former President Hosni Mubarak was removed from power in March 2011. 

Judge Mohammed al-Sayed banned the group and ordered the government to seize its funds and administer its assets during a hearing Monday. "The court bans the activities of the Muslim Brotherhood organization and its non-governmental organization and all the activities that it participates in and any organization derived from it," al-Sayed announced on Egyptian state television. So, that's fairly all encompassing.

The ban is the latest step in the crackdown on the Brotherhood that began when former president Mohammed Morsi was ousted in July, which sparked months of unrest between the military-backed government and Islamist militants. Dozens of Brotherhood officials have been detained since, including its general guide Mohammed Badie, on suspicion of inciting violence. Some Brotherhood members were suspiciously killed while in police custody. 

There are fears the coming crackdown on Brotherhood members and activities may cause some members to clash with the military-backed government currently in power. At the beginning of September, Egypt's State Commissioners Authority recommended a court dissolve the group, citing a law banning non-governmental paramilitary groups. 

But for the Brotherhood, this is a return to the status quo under former dictator Hosni Mubarak. The group existed unofficially for 85 years, and didn't emerge to work openly and form an official political party until after Mubarak was overthrown in 2011. The group went on to win a string of elections and take power when Mohammad Morsi won Egypt's first democratic election. But the public turned against Morsi eventually and the military forced him out of office, too.

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