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The young Pakistani girl who was nearly assassinated by Taliban forces last October has been discharged from a British hospital, but still faces more surgery and lengthy recovery process. Malala Yousafzai had been receiving treatment at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, England, after she was shot in the head by Taliban gunmen on her way to school last year. Yousfzai had angered the terrorist group after writing an online diary for the BBC that criticized their attempts to keep young girls from getting an education. The shooting incident brought her and her cause global attention and even made her a runner-up for Time's Person of the Year. 

Although, doctors do expect her to make a complete recovery, Yousafzai will have to return to the hospital in a few weeks to have reconstructive surgery on her skull. The bullet that hit her, traveled along her face and lodged in her neck, but miraculously did not cause any permanent brain damage. Her entire family temporarily moved to England, both to be with her during her recovery and to avoid further reprisals back home. 

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