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The four day ceasefire agreed upon by Bashar al-Assad and Syrian rebels should be observing its second day, but both sides have continued fighting and show no signs of slowing down. Assad and the rebels hesitantly agreed to a ceasefire brokered by U.N. special envoy Lakhdar Brahimi over the four days of Eid al-Adha observance. Both sides would only agree if they could reserve the right to respond to attacks from the opposing side. Some areas saw lulls in fighting on the first proposed day, but for the most part fighting continued. 

The Syrian army spent Saturday raining the Damascus and Aleppo suburbs with mortar fire beginning at 7 a.m., according to activists. Syrian warplanes allegedly bombed a building in Dmascus, as well. The Syrian army charges "terrorist groups" set off a car bomb the same Damascus suburbs where the mortar fire took place, and that rebels bomb a military police patrol in Aleppo. 

The failed ceasefire probably won't reflect too poorly on Brahimi. His predecessor tried and failed to impose a ceasefire, too. 

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