This article is from the archive of our partner .

The 14-year-old activist who was shot in the head by Taliban gunmen has been airlifted to Birmingham, England, to get more advanced medical care. Doctors in Pakistan were able to remove a bullet from the skull of Malala Yousafzai, but there was extensive damage to the bones in her head that will need to be repaired and she will also need "intensive neuro rehabilitation." On Sunday, Al Jazeera reported that her chance for survival was slim, but she was apparently stable enough to handle the flight to England, where she will get more specialized care.

Moving her out of the country will also presumably make her safer, as well. The Taliban has promised to attack her again, should she survive, as retaliation for her writing that criticized their actions in the Swat Valley, where her father runs one of the few schools that allows female students. Despite the protests in support of Malala, violence in the region has not abated. A large group of Taliban fighters attacked a police station in northwest Pakistan on Monday, killing at least five officers and beheading a local police chief. The gun battle lasted for several hours and the station and several vehicles were burned before attackers fled the town of Matni, near the city of Peshawar.

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.