Transcripts Make That Italian Cruise Captain Look Even Worse

If you thought Captain Franscesco Schettino couldn't look any worse after abandoning the capsized Costa Concordia--think again. New transcripts between Schettino and port authorities have surfaced today, painting a cowardly picture of the captain as he tried to direct rescue efforts from a lifeboat. 

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Update 2:20 p.m.: A judge placed Francesco Schettino, captain of the Italian cruise liner that sank this weekend, under house arrest after his first court appearance on accusations of manslaughter and abandoning his ship.

Update: And in case reading the transcript wasn't enough, listening to the conversation is worthwhile. The Telegraph has it in Italian but subtitled and even in a foreign language, you can hear the disbelief in the Coast Guard guy's voice. "Look Schettino, perhaps you have saved yourself from the sea, but I will make you look very bad," the port authority rep says at one point. This transcript seems to do just that on his behalf.

Update 10:53 a.m. Five more bodies have been found in the capsized Costa Concordia, bringing the death toll to 11 reports The Guardian. The four men and one woman found were all wearing lifejackets and are thought to be passengers at this time.

Original: If you thought Captain Franscesco Schettino couldn't look any worse after abandoning the capsized Costa Concordia--think again. New transcripts between Schettino and port authorities have surfaced today, painting a cowardly picture of the captain as he tried to direct rescue efforts from a lifeboat.  "What are you doing? Are you abandoning the rescue? Captain, this is an order, I am the one in charge now," reads a transcript documenting an exchange between Costa Concordia Captain Franscesco Schettino (who faces a possible manslaughter charge that could land him 15 years in prison) and port authorities.

At one point in the transcript there's this troublesome exchange:  It begins with a coast guard official telling Schettino that  "there are already bodies." "How many?", is Schettino's puzzled response.  "That is for you to tell me, what are you doing? Do you want to go home?" responds the coast guard official.

Twenty-nine people are still missing due to Friday night's accident (and possibly Schettino's lackluster captaincy), and according to news reports, it doesn't look very good. The Telegraph mentions that "hope is fading" and Al Jazeera points out that calling it "a rescue effort" is very kind, but that hasn't stopped the Italian Navy from orchestrating a desperate rescue attempt today by blasting through the ship's hull. The explosions will now allow the Italian Navy to explore the chambers of the ship that were previously inaccessible in hopes of finding the ship's remaining missing passengers or rather,  as news outlets would predict, recovering dead bodies.

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