Breast Implants Are the Last Thing You Want Recalled

A series of reports about potentially faulty breast implants (made in France) prompted German officials to issue a sweeping recommendation for women who have them to get them removed.

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A series of reports about potentially faulty breast implants (made in France) prompted German officials to issue a sweeping recommendation on Friday for women who have them to get them removed. This recall of sorts sounds messy. A growing number of reports have recently surfaced that implants made by the now defunct French company Poly Implant Prothese (PIP) can rupture. Warning of "possible health risks" the Walter Schwerdtfeger, chairman of Germany's Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices, stipulated "how urgent a removal is in any given case depends essentially on how long the patient has had the implant," according to the Associated Press. While it's not clear how many the recommendation might affect, the numbers of women with the potentially faulty implants elsewhere in Europe suggest that plastic surgeons will be pretty busy this month. In the United Kingdom alone, over 42,000 women have PIP implants; over 30,000 French women have them. Though the German warning comes after British officials balked at the severity of the problem -- "There is not sufficient evidence to recommend routine removal," said the U.K.'s health secretary Andrew Lansley this week, though it's now been announced that the National Health Service (NHS) will take out the implants for free -- it seems prudent to take extreme caution when a product that's literally installed in your body might be defective.

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.