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Update (5:19 p.m.): Finally, the court has posted the prosecution's motion to dismiss the case. Check back with The Atlantic Wire for further analysis.

Update (5:10 p.m. EDT): The court has posted Diallo's motion to replace the prosecution to its website.

Update (4:50 p.m. EDT): The Times' Twitter stream has a few more updates on the meeting today between prosecutors and Diallo and her legal team. Thompson reportedly said the meeting was abrupt, lasting no more than 30 seconds, and that prosecutors "rudely walked out of meeting with accuser w/o answering questions." One of the assistant district attorneys reportedly said, "We’re going to dismiss the case. You have lied to us repeatedly. We can’t win the case."

Update (4:40 p.m. EDT): The New York Times story on the filing has been updated to include the following passage from the DA:

“The nature and number of the complainant’s falsehoods leave us unable to credit her version of events beyond a reasonable doubt, whatever the truth may be about the encounter between the complainant and the defendant,” the papers state. “If we do not believe her beyond a reasonable doubt, we cannot ask a jury to do so.”

Update (4:22 p.m.): A New York Times Tweet about the 25-page-long motion filed by the Manhattan District Attorney's office: "DA's motion: Accuser went from credible, with 'unwavering' account, to one who 'has not been truthful on matters great and small.' "

Update (4:19 p.m.): The Telegraph's Jon Swaine posted the statement from Strauss-Kahn's attorneys William Taylor and Benjamin Brafman:

We have maintained from the beginning of this case that our client is innocent. We also maintained that there were many reasons to believe that Mr Strauss-Kahn’s accuser was not credible. Mr Strauss-Kahn and his family are grateful that the District Attorney’s office took our concerns seriously and concluded on its own that this case cannot proceed further. We look forward to attending the hearing on Tuesday.

Update (4:06 p.m.): The New York Times' City Room post on the news has comments from Kenneth Thompson, Diallo's attorney: 

“The Manhattan district attorney, Cyrus Vance, has denied the right of a woman to get justice in a rape case,” Mr. Thompson said. “He has not only turned his back on this victim but he has also turned his back on the forensic, medical and other physical evidence in this case. If the Manhattan district attorney, who is elected to protect our mothers, our daughters, our sisters, our wives and our loved ones, is not going to stand up for them when they’re raped or sexually assaulted, who will?”

One of Strauss-Kahn's lawyers, meanwhile, said he was "grateful" Vance "concluded on its own that this case cannot proceed further," according to a NYT Metro tweet.

Update (3:56 p.m. EDT): Women's advocacy groups and supporters of Diallo plan to rally in protest of Vance's decision from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the courthouse at 100 Centre St. A statement by the organizers read, in part, "Public scrutiny of women who accuse men of rape is itself a manifestation of misogyny. In this particular case, the fact that the accused is wealthy, politically connected, and white; while the accuser is poor, non-white, and immigrant suggests that there are unfortunate social stigmas at play that promote a victim-blaming mentality."

Prosecutors in the Dominique Strauss-Kahn case have filed a motion to dismiss the criminal sexual assault charges against the former International Monetary Fund director. The announcement came after a Monday afternoon meeting with Nafissatou Diallo, the Sofitel Hotel maid who says Dominique Strauss-Kahn tried to rape her when she came to clean his room on May 14. The meeting lasted less than 10 minutes, according to tweets from reporters who were there. 

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