News coverage illuminates, and it distorts. You can forget that most Egyptians, rich and poor, aren't out in the streets. They're out in the streets on Zamalek, the island in the Nile that is home to the wealthy, and the extremely wealthy, but they're drinking lattes, not demonstrating:

Walking down the leafy, tranquil streets of Zamalek on Thursday you could be forgiven for feeling like you were in an Egypt's Ramat Aviv and that the January 25th revolution never happened, or that if it had, it was never violently put down, but just faded off into the night, the sing-song chanting in the square merely a fever dream long past.

Omar laughed off any suggestions that the clashes would spread over the river into Zamalak, saying "the violence won't spread here, Zamalek people live in a bubble, an island both figuratively and literally."

"Not only that, but many of the people in Zamalek sympathize with Mubarak's economic and social policies, which have helped make some of them rich."

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.