I'm getting to it, I'm getting to it. In the meantime, might I recommend Pejman Yousefzadeh's story on the controversy? An excerpt:

Walt has become exceedingly irresponsible in his rhetoric since the time that I knew him. His argument-and that of his cohorts-that bloggers are not responsible for what their commenters write is a somewhat appealing one, but at the end of the day, that's a rather facile response to a serious issue. Writing about Israel, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the status of the Palestinians, and the Middle East as a whole is an enterprise fraught with emotion, anger, outrage, and ancient grievances. Those who engage in these discussions owe it to others to keep their heads level so as not to fan the flames of an already inflammatory subject. They also owe it to others to try to keep the heads of their supporters level. If that means repeatedly denouncing those supporters who take one's contentions and extend them to despicable levels, then so be it. That means that Zionists have to denounce-repeatedly, if need be-people who think that Baruch Goldstein was a swell guy, and that means that people like Stephen Walt, Philip Weiss, Andrew Sullivan, and Glenn Greenwald have to denounce-repeatedly, if need be-those who latch on to their arguments to openly preach anti-Semitism, and anti-Zionism that is nothing more than thinly-disguised anti-Semitism.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.