From an interview with Hannah Rosenthal, the new State Department special envoy charged with combating anti-Semitism, in Tablet Magazine:

Tablet: Your predecessor, Gregg Rickman, was very involved in winning visas for Yemeni Jews and was also very critical of the United Nations for its approach to Israel. What are your top priorities?

Rosenthal: I don't know what the top agenda item is going to be, but when I look at newspapers and listen to people around the world who I know, I'm very troubled to see increases in anti-Semitic acts and attitudes in Europe. As the child of a Holocaust survivor, I thought Europe would be further along in the tolerance agenda than they are. I hate to hear about boycotts; I hate to hear about graves and cemeteries being defaced; I hate to hear about speeches tinged with stereotypes of Jews. These are things we thought would fade into distant memory.

Really? Anti-Semitism in Europe is the problem? Of course Europe has a problem with anti-Semitism (much of it manifesting itself as "anti-Zionism"), but Rosenthal, in this interview, has nothing at all to say about Muslim anti-Semitism, and nothing to say even about Iranian Holocaust denial. Nothing. And let's look at the logic of this statement: "As the child of a Holocaust survivor, I thought Europe would be further along in the tolerance agenda than they are." Why? Why should a continent that has historically been unable to tolerate the presence of Jews be expected to tolerate the presence of Jews? I'm always surprised by people who are surprised by European anti-Semitism. I'm not sure if Rosenthal is myopic or just a sloppy thinker. I'm not even sure I should judge her thinking based on this interview, but it's not a very impressive start.  

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