A Goldblog reader writes, in reference to this Palin post:

I would argue that we're not completely out of the ghetto.  Israel doesn't exist as a fact on the ground because of the magnanimity of the European states, or the surrounding Arab ones.  It's there because of the support of the United States of America, and for no other reason--not its moral claims or its humanitarian status as a refuge for a historically persecuted people.  I don't think politics affords a lot of room to be choosy about your allies.  We don't support Egypt and Pakistan because of their independent judiciaries and free press; we don't work with Russia because of its sterling human rights record.  We do it because we believe it's in our long-term interest to do so, and that because of that, cooperation will ultimately conduce to promote freedom and human rights.

Jews have been the backbone of progressivism.  Many of progressivism's tenets are enshrined in law in Israel.  How has progressivism repaid that support?  By making anti-Zionism a central plank in its platform.  If evangelism extends a hand to Israel, why should Israel spurn it?  Very few other groups are willing to stand in support of Israel.  Evangelism proposes a certain narrative about God's intentions with respect to Jews.  Jewish beliefs differ.  As Natan Sharansky says, when the messiah arrives, we can resolve the question by asking, "Is this your first visit?"

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