Quentin Tarantino couldn't even come up with this scenario of Jewish revenge, from the obituary of Richard W. Sonnenfeldt, who participated in the interrogations of Nazi leaders:

His first interrogation was of Goering, who had been Hitler's designated successor. During the encounter, Mr. Sonnenfeldt said, he felt "the Jewish refugee I once had been tugging at my sleeve," he wrote in his autobiography, "Witness to Nuremberg" (2006, Arcade Publishing).

Despite his nervousness, he said, he sharply reprimanded Goering for interrupting. "When I speak, you don't interrupt me," he said to Goering, recalling his words in an interview with Charlie Rose on PBS in 2007. "You wait until I'm finished. And then when you have to say something, I will listen to you and decide whether it's necessary to translate it."

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