Who cares? Jewish self-hatred is an entirely predictable phenomenon. It ain't easy being Jewish, and it hasn't been easy for a while, at least since Saul became Paul, and certainly since the Jews of Arabia said no thank you when Muhammad offered them his own vision of monotheism. Some Jews, the weaker ones, adopt the culture and outlook of their oppressors. Some do it sincerely, because they have internalized the anti-Semitic calumnies hurled at them, and others do it for cynical reasons, such as career advancement. Others do it because they are scared, and so assume that associating themselves with anti-Semites will afford them some kind of protection. I have no idea if Moody's roots are Jewish, but it's immaterial in any case.

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