Despite unleashing a global wave of controversy and criticism -- and political turmoil in the region -- Iran continues to draw loyal support from Hezbollah, which not only "subscribes to that nation's ideology of theocratic leadership" but also accepts the conduct and outcome of last month's elections. As such, "the outcome of current debates there over the way theocratic authority is wielded, and the secular question of how Iran should manage its external relations, is sure to reverberate inside Lebanon." Sheikh Naim Qassem, the militant group's second-in-command, told the Christian Science Monitor that Hezbollah looks to Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Iran's hard-line supreme leader, for religious rules and sets the guidelines for the party's general political performance.

Other than that, Hezbollah is an authentic Lebanese resistance group.

We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters@theatlantic.com.