The Hidden Story of Harley Quinn and How She Became the Superhero World’s Most Successful Woman
Abraham Riesman | Vulture
"No one could have predicted that Harley would last beyond her first appearance, much less become the title character in a series that cracks the best-seller charts every month."

To Shill a Mockingbird: How a Manuscript’s Discovery Became Harper Lee’s ‘New’ Novel
Neely Tucker | The Washington Post
"Pull up a rocking chair, pour two fingers of bourbon—make it three—and let’s have a little chat, in the gloaming in this little town in south Alabama."

Copyright Mixtape: How The "Blurred Lines" Lawsuit Could Change Music Forever
Parker Higgins | Ratter
"Just what are the 'copyrighted elements'? Answering that question is a bizarre opportunity to look at pop culture through the eyes of the law."

Last Girl in Larchmont
Emily Nussbaum | The New Yorker
"This was the harder-to-handle part of Rivers’s legacy, her powerful alloy of girl talk and woman hate, her instinct for how misogyny can double as female bonding."

"Out of My Mouth Comes Unimpeachable Manly Truth": What I Learned From Watching a Week of Russian TV
Gary Shteyngart | The New York Times Magazine
"What will happen to me—an Americanized Russian-speaking novelist who emigrated from the Soviet Union as a child—if I let myself float into the television-filtered head space of my former countrymen?"

The Education of Alex Rodriguez
J.R. Moehringer | ESPN
"He keeps talking ... totally failing to answer the only question running through their minds. What the hell is A-Rod doing in my marketing class?"

Cable TV Shows Are Sped Up to Squeeze in More Ads
Joe Flint | The Wall Street Journal
"Time Warner Inc. ’s TBS used compression technology to speed up the movie. The purpose: stuffing in more TV commercials."

The Resurrection of Kyle Wiltjer
Jordan Ritter Conn | Grantland
"Why the Gonzaga forward had to leave Kentucky to realize his All-American potential."

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