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After months of touring, divorce rumors, the MTV Video Music Awards, more divorce rumors, and so many damn divorce rumors, it all comes to this. Saturday at 9 p.m., HBO is premiering Beyoncé and Jay Z's "On the Run Tour" concert film. And if history is any indication, it will break Twitter in half with proclamations of "YAAAAAASSS" and "WERK" and "FLAWLESS." It will be so great, and yet also so very, very much.

Generally, I'm against telling people how to tweet unless they are either A) public figures with large followings, meaning they wield an abnormally high level of influence, or B) actively and directly judging others for how they tweet. Otherwise, we all use Twitter differently, and overthinking it feels like wasted energy. But live-tweeting is a slightly different game, because you're not just tweeting for yourself. You're taking part in a much larger conversation.

We've talked about how to live-tweet before – specifically, during Scandal – but during a Beyoncé concert, Twitter is especially active. (As we were reminded during her VMAs performance.) With so many people tweeting, you're bound to think of the same ideas. Here are some tips to stand out in the sea of opinions.

DO:

  • ...highlight parts of performances that everyone won't be talking about. Did you love Bey's incredible energy on "Ring the Alarm"? Or the spectacular throwback appeal of "Big Pimpin"? Throw it out there! Chances are you weren't the only one, even if you haven't seen anyone mention it yet.
  • ...use the proper hashtags. Will it be #OnTheRunTour? #BeyonceAndJayZ? #BeyAndJay? We won't know until the night of, but make sure you're following along with the right conversation.
    • Yes, I get it, hashtags are cheesy. But they actually do increase exposure on your tweets. You want those RTs, right?
  • ...give it up for the hard work from those that aren't our royal couple. One of the best parts of Beyoncé's "I Am ... Yours" concert movie was her performance with two members of her all-girl band, BIBI and Divinity. Sure, "Irreplaceable" is always great – and you gotta appreciate Bey's spirited call-and-response direction with the audience – but these two incredible women clearly bring out the best in their queen.

DON'T:

  • ...reference any super obvious song lyrics. I promise you that you will not be the first person to tweet about how you "woke up like this." Nor does the world need you to say anything about "99 Problems." I promise, someone has it covered.
    • That counts double for "surfbort." If you feel absolutely required to tweet the word "surfbort," at least spell it properly. Don't bring in your properly spelled "surfboard" nonsense.
  • ...say anything twice. If you wind up "literally dying" during the duration of the concert film, we only need to be informed once. (We actually don't need to be informed at all, but I'm assuming there's no stopping you.)
  • ...point out "fun facts" that aren't really. Yes, Bey will change a lyric in "Resentment." Yes, Jay does bring her out to do the chorus on "Holy Grail." Don't be surprised. The Internet told us these things already.
  • ...breathlessly declare Beyoncé as queen. We're all there, you guys. We've acknowledged our savior. You don't have to convince us.
  • ...ignore Jay Z. Yes, I know, I'm not fond of his verse on "Drunk in Love" either. And he's definitely getting lazy with age. But this is half his tour as well. He's bringing out old favorites and new in equal measure. And his non-"Drunk" collaborations with Bey are still sharp. He deserves your praise, too.
  • ...use the phrase "your faves could never." You know how much the internet hates Beyoncé stans these days? We are thisclose to overstaying our welcome. [EDITOR'S NOTE: [A universe of side-eye.] — JR]
  • ...forget the pop stars who fell before Bey. She may seem unstoppable now, but that makes it all the more important to enjoy her run at the top while it lasts. Let's just enjoy it without driving everyone else away.

This article is from the archive of our partner The Wire.

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