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Welcome to the Box Office Report, where Kevin Hart rumbles again and Clint Eastwood stumbles again.

1. Think Like a Man Too (Screen Gems): $30 million in 2,225 theaters.

Despite a rotten Rotten Tomatoes score, Kevin Hart's second installment of the Think Like a Man franchise (based on Steve Harvey's relationship book) won the weekend. More impressively, the opening numbers were nearly identical to the original  ($33.2 million) and took the box office crown with a medium-sized release. Coupled with his Ice Cube-assisted Ride Along, Hart has now won the box office twice in 2014.

2. 22 Jump Street (Sony): $29 million in 3,306 theaters.

After scoring big last weekend, Channing Tatum and Jonah Hill were just barely deposed this week. A 50-plus percent drop from last week isn't entirely unexpected for the back-to-school (again) flick, especially given the fact that the sequel-mocking sequel opening so massively last week. 

3. How to Train Your Dragon 2 (Fox): $25.3 million in 4,268 theaters.

Closing out a close three-way race of sequels for the crown, How to Train Your Dragon 2 also tumbled by half in its sophomore week, a precipitous drop for an animated flick. International sales helped swing the dragon's tail (or whatever) past its production budget.

4. Jersey Boys (Warner Brothers): $13.5 million in 2,905 theaters.

Yikes, Clint. The box office sure felt lucky without Jersey Boys, which stumbled into a fourth-place opening. Middling reviews certainly didn't help. It's also hard to adapt Broadway musicals to the big screen. (Just like it's hard to turn Hollywood star power into political clout at the RNC.)

5. Maleficent (Buena Vista): $13 million in 3,450 theaters.

In its fourth week, Maleficent hung tough, only dropping by a third. With international sales included, Angelina Jolie has bewitched her way beyond the half-a-billion dollar threshold.

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