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Ride Along held on to the top spot at the box office this weekend, while I, Frankenstein completely bombed out, making only $8.2 million and finishing a disappointing sixth, behind some movie called The Nut Job. Looks like the monster-movie-with-Aaron-Eckhart genre won't really catch on as a thing. 

Your top five:

1. Ride Along (Universal): $21.1 million in 2,759 theaters

The Kevin Hart/Ice Cube comedy had topped $75 million in just two weeks. The secret weapon? Saturday Night Live's Jay Pharoah. I mean, probably, right? 

2. Lone Survivor (Universal): $12.6 million in 3,162 theaters

The Mark Wahlberg soldiers drama continues its march towards $100 million, which it will likely reach this week. Let no one say that Oscar nominations on the sound categories don't provide that crucial box-office oomph.

3. The Nut Job (Open Road Films): $12.3 million in 3,472 theaters

Just hear me out on this one: what if we got Will Arnett to lend his voice to an animated movie. I honestly think his voice would work in the animated realm. We should get started by having Arnett star in every animated movie in 2014.

4. Frozen (Disney): $49 million in 2,757 theaters

Wicked on Ice continues to drop by incredibly low percentages, keeping itself in the top five in its tenth week of release. At 23%, it's got the lowest week-to-week attrition in the top ten, and it'll top $350 million this week. And STILL it's about $20 million away from besting Despicable Me 2 for the title of highest-earning animated film of 2013. Which, if you think about it for two seconds, will drive you crazy.

5. Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit (Paramount): $8.8 million in 3,387 theaters

In its second week, the Chris Pine prospective franchise re-starter has still only made back half its $60 million budget. All that cash spent on digitally American-izing Keria Knightley's accent isn't looking so smart now.

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