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Weeks away from his (possible) retirement, Chris Brown is having some health issues, so maybe his timing is perfect. But Brown may need to search out a new medical staff to join his representation, because the current diagnosis is suspect.

Around 1 a.m. Friday, someone at the Record Plant recording studio in Los Angeles called 911 because Chris Brown was allegedly having a seizure. But Brown, TMZ reported, refused treatment when the EMTs showed up. Mystery surrounded the case, and we had questions like, why was Chris Brown having a seizure at a recording studio at 1 a.m. on a Friday morning? 

This was the explanation Brown's team gave the gossip blogs on Saturday: 

"His doctor tended to him this afternoon and attributes the [non-epileptic seizure] to intense fatigue and extreme emotional stress, both due to the continued onslaught of unfounded legal matters and the nonstop negativity."

But something tells me Brown's agent hasn't taken the Hippocratic Oath. Everyone being mean, as TMZ explained it, should not cause seizures. But the singer's team is right about one thing: Brown has continually faced legal trouble, and it recently landed him in jail. 

Brown spent about some time in an L.A. prison this week over a probation violation stemming from his 2009 felony assault charge for hitting Rihanna. The singer allegedly refused to give over his proper information after a car accident, and then left the scene. The hit-and-run misdemeanour landed him in jail for a matter of minutes, which must have been supremely stressful. 

But the explanation seems dubious none the less. Perhaps hinting towards that retirement, Brown echoed his agent's sentiments with a late Saturday night tweet:

If Brown follows through with his threats to retire at the ripe age of 24 after his next album, X, is released on August 20, then everyone would get what they want. Brown wouldn't necessarily be loved, but many would love that he's gone. Brown's health troubles would disappear. Maybe the time off is a good idea. 

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