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Today in show business news: It looks as though Kris Jenner's talk show didn't work out, Paul Giamatti heads to TV, and we may see Richard Linklater's fascinating new film next year.

Kris Jenner, mother of Kim Kardashian and others, had a talk show. I say "had" because, if Radar is to be believed, her show has been canceled by Fox after its brief test run, due to low ratings and lack of interest from advertisers. Granted that is a fairly big "if" up there. Because this is Radar Online we're talking about. But, if they are correct? Well, I'm sorry, but yes. Good. Thankfully. Finally someone, somewhere did not reward someone from the Kardashian-Jenner family with something they did not earn simply because they are a Kardashian-Jenner. I wish no ill-will toward the woman, but did you see her show? She was dull, she couldn't get good guests unless they were family members or friends of family members clearly just doing her a favor, and then she had embarrassing things like this, sad, blatant advertisements embedded within the fabric of the show. It was a mess, and I would not want to watch more of it nor would I want to advertise on it. One semi-interesting appearance by Kanye West at the very end cannot redeem an entire series. So, let's hope that Radar is right and the family learns that not everything they want to do will just happen by dint of their wanting it. [Radar]

Someone just slightly more deserving has landed a TV show. Paul Giamatti has been set to star in an FX pilot called Hoker, which is described as "a story of mid-life crisis and murder that features the hardboiled and possibly insane homicide detective, Hoke Moseley (Giamatti), in pre-chic Miami circa 1985." Sounds about right for Paulie G. Promisingly, Scott Frank will write and direct the pilot, and run the show should it go to series. Frank wrote the screenplays for Out of Sight and Get Shorty, so he should definitely be running a television show. This is good. Do this right, guys. [Deadline]

Also good: Ethan Hawke says that his next collaboration with director Richard Linklater will be coming next year, most likely. And it's quite an intriguing project. Boyhood has filmed one scene every year since 2002, telling the tell of a boy as he grows from childhood into late adolescence. Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette play his parents. Doesn't that sound intriguing? A little strange and maybe sad, what with time passing and mortality and all that, but only in the way that theĀ Seven Up documentary series is sad. And really couldn't you think of the Before series in this way, only one that filmed every nine years? And those were great! I don't know. This sounds fascinating to me. [Slashfilm]

Warner Bros. is planning to spend $25 million to market the 3D re-release of The Wizard of Oz. Yes. In 2013, Warner Bros. is spending $25 million to get people to see the freaking Wizard of Oz. Sigh. [Deadline]

Recent Scientology fleer Leah Remini has joined the cast of the next Dancing with the Stars. So, out of the frying pan and into... the glitter pit? The feather dome? The cha-cha cauldron? Anything works, really. [The Hollywood Reporter]

Harry Connick Jr. may be the third judge on the next season of American Idol, though Fox had originally wanted an industry insider. Their top choice for the job, producer Dr. Luke, had to pull out of negotiations when his record label wouldn't let him do the show. So Connick Jr., who has guest-mentored charmingly in seasons past, might take the chair. The worrying thing for Fox at the moment is that the delay in finding the third judge could delay the show's entire production schedule. The first taping was supposed to be next Tuesday, but that might not be possible now. Eh, but it's fine, really. This thing doesn't come back until January. They could film the whole auditions thing the weekend beforehand and it would be OK. It's the 13th season! No one would mind. Be loose, Idol, be loose. [The Hollywood Reporter]

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