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Benedict Cumberbatch's Julian Assange movie The Fifth Estate will play opening night of the Toronto Film Festival in September, which is the industry's opening of awards season and often a crystal ball for Oscar success and failure. It's where the buzz started for Argo last year, and—as Time pointed out—2007's No Country for Old Men got its start at Toronto. It can also be a good place to weed out films that studios may want to pitch as Oscar contenders but ultimately do not have the chops. (ThinkCloud Atlas.)

The lineup, which the festival announced at a press conference and began posting on Twitter this morning, features a number of other films we've had our eye on for awards season success. One of Toronto's successes likely has a good chance to take home Oscar gold.  Alfonso Cuarón's Sandra Bullock lost-in-space movie Gravity, which wowed at Comic-Con this past weekend, will have its North American premiere in Toronto. World premiere galas will include August: Osage County, the Meryl Streep/Julia Roberts-starrer based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning play and Idris Elba's Mandela biopic Mandela: Long Walk to Freedom, both of which are Weinstein productions.

In what Kevin Jagernauth at The Playlist called a "surprise" because many thought the film would head to the Venice Film Festival, Steve McQueen's 12 Years a Slave will premiere. As for other noteworthy films: Dallas Buyers Club, the movie which Matthew McConaughey lost all that weight for, will also be there, as will Jason Reitman's latest Labor Day, and Ron Howard's Rush. On a sad note, Nicole Holofcener's Enough Said featuring a performance from the late James Gandolfini will screen, as will the film featuring Cory Monteith's last performance. The festival will close with Daneil Schehter's Elmore Leonard adaptation Life of Crime

It all gets underway September 5. Update: Here's a full list

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