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Welcome to the Box Office Report, where we know sophomore year is when the wheels completely come off and you spend most of your time walking around like a zombie and avoiding the cops. 

1. Monsters University (Pixar): $46.2 million in 4,004 theaters [Week 2]

You can't stop and won't stop the Pixar sequel machine. If anything, Monsters U's sustained success over the last two weeks, to the tune of $171 million total so far, in the face of major challenges from big blockbusters bodes well for the upcoming Finding Nemo sequel. Pixar fans young and old will show up to see characters they know and love. However, another Cars sequel (or something along those lines) would be a terrible idea.

2. The Heat (Fox): $40 million in 3,181 theaters

Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy's R-rated romp couldn't take the top spot this weekend, like McCarthy's last movie, Identity Theft. But this $40 million performance is much more impressive. It may seem like only $4 million more than Identity Theft's $36 million first weekend take, but The Heat debuted on a crowded weekend in June and not an empty weekend in February

3. World War Z (Paramount): $29.8 million in 3,607 theaters [Week 2]

Can we talk about Brad Pitt's hair in this movie? Maybe we're still not willing to accept this is Brad Pitt's "cool dad" era. Snatch was on TV the other night. Remember Snatch

4. White House Down (Sony): $25.7 million in 3,222 theaters

Channing Tatum starring in a Die Hard sequel was too obvious, so this is what happened instead. Because, you know, heaven forbid one of the new Die Hard movies actually end up being watchable. 

5. Man of Steel (Warner): $20.8 million in 4,131 million [Week 3]

At some point when they were editing Man of Steel, one of the producers must have realized "hm, maybe we shouldn't destroy so much of Manhattan Metropolis. This is all a bit gratuitous and unnecessary, no?" And then Zach Snyder fired him and ordered another fictional block be demolished as a message to any other staffers who would dare cross him again. The fictional citizens would suffer because of any more dissent. 

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