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Star Trek is supposed to go boldly where no man has gone before, right? Well, the new teaser for the sequel Star Trek: Into Darkness is out today, and it's going where many other movie trailers have gone before — just two days after its new poster wasn't looking too original, either. But, hey, at least there's Khan, right? Right?

Of course there are good things in here, too — and not just Chris Pine's eyes — especially since we get a peak at the villain played by Benedict Cumberbatch, an actor whose presence (and name!) are much welcomed. But the gripes far outweigh the hype in the reactions so far, and it seems that if we have one hope for 2013 at the movies, it's that blockbuster trailers will stop using music that sounds exactly like the soundtrack to Inception and voiceovers from villains who sound maybe a bit too menacing:

Or, more generally:

Meanwhile, the folks over at Den of Geek note that that the Japanese version of the trailer—we have the French one up there—has an extra shot that "will immediately recall a particularly moving moment in Star Trek II: The Wrath Of Khan." Over at Screen Rant, Rob Keyes analyzes what we can learn about Into Darkness, which has been shrouded in secrecy, including more details that might fuel rumors that Cumberbatch is actually playing Khan. Keyes adds that "The more common theory, and strongly hinted at in the official plot synopsis, is that Cumberbatch is playing a variation of Starfleet officer Gary Mitchell...who in the original canon was best pals with Kirk throughout Starfleet Academy and later served under him on the Enterprise." 

We'll see more of the movie soon, though: a nine-minute glimpse is screening before IMAX showings of The Hobbit beginning next weekend, and a full, two-minute trailer is due next week. Here's hoping for fewer structures collapsing and more glimpses of the characters whose relationships actually define this franchise. 

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