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Last night, CNN aired a wild interview between Piers Morgan and Robert Blake that belongs in a special place in the annals of on-air celebrity meltdowns. Wearing a cowboy hat and a sleeveless T-shirt, Blake lashed out in a profanity-laced tirades at his first ex-wife, the cops who accused him of murdering his second wife, and at Morgan for talking about them at all.

Blake was on the show to promote his new memoir about his life in Hollywood, that began when he was child actor in the "Our Gang" movies, included an Oscar-nominated turn in In Cold Blood, and led to a rocky marriages, drug addiction, and legal battles. However, Blake got angriest when Morgan brought up the most well-known chapter of his life — the trial for the murder of his second wife, Bonnie Lee Bakley, that ended with Blake's acquittal.

Early in the interview, Blake pointed at the camera to address the "rotten bastard cops that ripped my guts out and left me by the road to die."

Blake got angriest when he accused Morgan of calling him a liar and not doing his research. "I've never allowed anyone to ask me the questions you're asking," said Blake.

As the interview progressed, Blake grew angrier and more combative, while trying to dismiss the entire murder case as "boring" and irrelevant.

At certain points in the interview, Blake began quoting from his own book and old movies in his answers. During the second half of the show, Blake called Morgan "Charlie Potatoes" and then continued to refer to him as "Charlie" until the end of the show (when he called him "Pierce".)

Ultimately, Blake blamed the murder on some unknown person from his wife's past. Saying that Bakley she was a con artist, Blake says he believe someone she "burned" tracked her down after the publicity from their marriage gave away her whereabouts. (The murder took place just six months after they were married.) Blake was found not guilty in his criminal trial, but was lost a wrongful death lawsuit in civil court.

The interview was quite a hit on Twitter, and naturally, Morgan was quite proud of the result.

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