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Zach Snyder is the master of making an amazing trailer to get you excited and then ultimately disappointing you once your butt is in a theater seat. He's done it again, too, with the latest trailers for Man of Steel. They look like he's taking Clark Kent into Terrence Malick territory. 

Credit for the Malick comparison goes to The Hollywood Reporter, but it's not exactly hidden. Check the comments on /Film's post about the trailers. The trailer starts with a shot waves washing over rocks. The best shot probably comes when we see Clark as a young boy, face obscured, playing in the yard with a red cape tied around his neck contrasting over his white T-shirt while laundry blows in the wind in the immediate background. It looks like it's straight of the Tree of Life B-reel. The two trailers are visually identical. The only difference is one trailer is dubbed with a speech from Clark Kent's human father Kevin Costner, and the other trailer is dubbed with a speech from Kal-El's Kryptonian father Jor-El, played by Russell Crowe. Daddy issues?! Snyder really is doing his best Malick impersonation. Man of Steel is actually a Tree of Life sequel. Sean Penn spent the whole movie wandering aimlessly looking for the Fortress of Solitude, not the ghosts of his dead parents. There are shots of Kent working on a fishing boat for some reason. The only time we get to see Kent in his red and blue Superman tights is at the very end when he blasts off into the stratosphere for no apparent reason. Just whoosh! And he's gone. Also, the Superman emblem at the end looks weird. They should not use that.

The cast has us excited for this movie more than anything else. Well, that and the return of General Zod. Thank god this isn't another "Lex Luthor is a rich bad guy" plot that Superman movies haven't been able to do anywhere near as well as the comics, or the Superman/Justice League cartoons have. Hopefully, even Zack Snyder can't screw this up. 

Would you prefer to be serenaded by Costner? 

Or by Russell Crowe?

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